'One of the finest novels of virtual reality yet written.'—SF Site on The Accord

CRITICALITY: Keith Brooke's book reviews

Science-fiction, fantasy and horror reviews by Keith Brooke

Over the years I've written reviews for the Guardian, Foundation, Interzone, Vector, Odyssey, Beyond and various other places. Most of my reviews these days are written for Arc and The Guardian (including contributing to the SF/F section of their 1000 novels everyone must read). The listing on this page is as comprehensive as I've been able to manage, and includes pretty much everything from 1997 onwards. Earlier reviews have been harder to track down and so aren't included here.

A note on identities
Just to complicate matters, I sometimes review under my other writing name, Nick Gifford. There's nothing underhand about this: it's simply that "Nick" writes fiction for young adults, so it makes sense to be him when reviewing other young adult fiction; and allowing Nick to review a few adult novels and art books helped plump up his CV in the early days!

sort by author; sort by date; reviews at infinity plus; reviews for the Guardian; reviews for Arc.

Forthcoming reviews (all publications)

Wolves by Simon Ings (The Guardian).

Most recent reviews (from the Guardian)

Sisters of the Revolution: A Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology by Jeff and Ann VanderMeer (editors) (The Guardian, October 2015). The Spectral Book of Horror Stories by Mark Morris (editor) (The Guardian, November 2014). Time's Mistress by Steven Savile (The Guardian, October 2014). Hurricane Fever by Tobias Buckell (The Guardian, July 2014). The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Eight by Jonathan Strahan (editor) (The Guardian, June 2014). The Unquiet House by Alison Littlewood (The Guardian, May 2014).

All reviews (from the Guardian)

Brian Aldiss (editor): A Science Fiction Omnibus (The Guardian, review published December 2007)
"This anthology may not quite change your world, but as a sampler of what SF can do it's hard to beat."

Lou Anders (editor): Sideways in Crime (The Guardian, review published June 2009)
"The high standard of the anthology is reflected by the fact that three of its stories have recently been shortlisted for the Sidewise Award for alternate fiction."

Kelley Armstrong: The Summoning (The Guardian, review published July 2008)
"Armstrong's gushing prose has the storyteller's knack of compelling the reader to start just one more chapter, despite knowing there must be a better way to spend one's time than this."

Neal Asher: Prador Moon (The Guardian, review published October 2008)
"...this punchy and very violent short novel from the Essex hard man of science fiction."

Mike Ashley (editor): The Mammoth Book of Apocalyptic SF (The Guardian, review published June 2010)
"What emerges from most of these stories is that apocalypse is not so much about the end, but about new beginnings - that staple of SF, the blank canvas. In this volume, Ashley fills that canvas with consummate skill."

Steve Aylett: The Complete Accomplice (The Guardian, review published October 2010)
"Steve Aylett is one of the great eccentrics of British genre fiction, whichever genre that might be."

Paolo Bacigalupi: Ship Breaker (The Guardian, review published August 2011)
"Ship Breaker, while less striking than Bacigalupi's debut, shows that the acclaim was not misplaced..."

Iain M Banks: Matter (The Guardian, review published March 2009)
"Another fine addition to Banks's Culture series."

Stephen Baxter: Flood (The Guardian, review published July 2009)
"A fine addition to the British science-fiction tradition of disaster novels, reading like something John Wyndham might have written if he had tackled climate change on a global scale, laced with the kind of scientific rigour you would expect from Baxter."

Peter S Beagle: Sleight of Hand (The Guardian, review published March 2011)
"So here it is: a new collection of stories by one of the all-time greats."

Chris Beckett: The Holy Machine ([written for The Guardian, but not published there due to a clash], review published July 2010)
"A very timely dystopia that marks Beckett out as an author to follow closely."

Robert Jackson Bennett: Mr Shivers (The Guardian, review published September 2010)
"A particularly striking debut novel."

Ray Bradbury: Ray Bradbury: Stories, Vols 1 and 2 (The Guardian, review published December 2008)
"Collected in these two enormous volumes are classic works of speculative fiction."

Tobias Buckell: Hurricane Fever (The Guardian, review published July 2014)
"A fine, no-frills ecological technothriller, complete with a mad bad villain, fast-paced action and a race against the clock finale."

Alan Campbell: Scar Night (The Guardian, review published May 2007)
For reasons of space, the closing line was dropped from the published review: "An unfeasibly good debut novel."

Orson Scott Card: Ender in Exile (The Guardian, review published November 2009)
"The novel picks up thirteen year-old Ender Wiggin's story in the aftermath of the war he almost singlehandedly won against the alien Buggers... Unfocused and suffering from the need to pull together too many threads from connected stories, Ender in Exile will nonetheless be welcomed by the many fans of this series."

Michael Cobley: Seeds of Earth (The Guardian, review published February 2010)
"Merciless alien invaders, lost human colonies, mysterious secrets of the ancients... a gripping science-fiction adventure that combines the traditions of the field with a deft contemporary touch."

Marianne de Pierres: Mirror Space (The Guardian, review published December 2009)
"In Mirror Space stuff happens, then something else happens and then it all pulls together, and then... the reader must wait for volume four."

Philip K Dick: Flow, My Tears, the Policeman Said (The Guardian, review published March 2007)
"...suddenly Dick is tugging at the thread again, unravelling Taverner's and the reader's perceptions as only he can."

Hal Duncan: Escape from Hell! (The Guardian, review published January 2009)
"Too grittily realistic to be satire, too funny to be straight adventure romp... a gripping and stylish read from one of the most talented new fantasy writers to emerge in a long time."

Ian C Esslemont: Night of Knives (The Guardian, review published May 2008)
"There is a lot going on here; as one character says of events, 'There is too much for any one person to get hold of,' which is both a strength and the potential downfall of this novel, a challenge Esslemont's page-turning storytelling fights valiantly from start to finish."

Neil Gaiman: Coraline (The Guardian, review published April 2009)
"Enchanting and creepy by turns, Coraline is a very grown-up fairy tale for all ages, a story that reads as if Alice's Adventures in Wonderland had been rewritten by Lemony Snicket in a particularly dark and twisted mood."

Gary Gibson: Final Days (The Guardian, review published June 2012)
"A masterclass in genre fiction."

Christopher Golden (editor): The Monster's Corner (The Guardian, review published September 2011)
"The Monster's Corner gives voice to the monsters and explores the fine line between them and us."

SL Grey: The Ward (The Guardian, review published October 2012)
"A dark and scary read."

Jon Courtenay Grimwood: Pashazade (The Guardian, review published September 2008)
"Grimwood writes rich and pacy prose, combining science fiction, thriller, and hard-boiled crime fiction with a vivid, sultry setting steeped in highly believable alternate history."

Marty Halpern (editor): Alien Contact (The Guardian, review published November 2011)
"In most cases Halpern's selections are spot on, making this an anthology which ... serves as an excellent snapshot of what modern science fiction has to offer."

Tom Holt: Blonde Bombshell (The Guardian, review published January 2011)
"A pacy romp with some beautifully executed set-pieces."

Matthew Hughes: The Damned Busters (The Guardian, review published April 2011)
"This is a funny and surprisingly endearing book."

Charlie Huston: Already Dead (The Guardian, review published February 2007)
"Skilfully interweaves a hidden vampire Manhattan with the city we think we know in a pacy, gripping read."

Shaun Hutson: Dying Words (The Guardian, review published August 2007)
"Sure, you could tear holes in the logic of the characters' actions, you could wish for artful prose and clever descriptions, but if you want pacy, explicit, edge-of-the-seat storytelling, Hutson is always a good bet."

Simon Ings: Wolves (The Guardian, forthcoming)
"This is a cleverly understated novel about reality and perception, and the resonances of past events that shape all that follows."

Debbie Johnson: Dark Vision (The Guardian, review published April 2014)
"Clever and full of sharp wisecracks, this is more comic than horror, a deftly told entertainment that shows there is certainly room in the world for a Liverpudlian Charlaine Harris."

Gwyneth Jones: Rainbow Bridge (The Guardian, review published April 2007)
"The author's style, full of ricochets and suggestion, treads the line between frustrating the reader and giving a kaleidoscopic view of a fragmented future..."

Roz Kaveney: Rituals - Rhapsody of Blood, Volume One (The Guardian, review published August 2012)
"A novel that treads a sometimes precarious line between scenes of genuine, gruesome horror and deft comic touches."

Kim Lakin-Smith: Autodrome (The Guardian, review published November 2013)
"An off-beat mystery adventure like no other."

Joe R Lansdale: The Best of Joe R Lansdale (The Guardian, review published April 2010)
"Let this volume of superb short work introduce you to the uncensored, unfiltered and really quite mad world of Joe R Lansdale. He is a writer deserving of a wide and appreciative audience."

Tim Lebbon: 30 Days of Night: Fear of the Dark (The Guardian, review published July 2010)
"...down-to-earth monsters in a hardcore horror tale by one of the UK's leading exponents of the genre."

Tim Lebbon: Coldbrook (The Guardian, review published October 2012)
"In the hands of one of the UK's foremost horror authors, though, this was never going to be just another zombie story, and in Coldbrook Tim Lebbon takes zombie apocalypse to new levels."

Alison Littlewood: The Unquiet House (The Guardian, review published May 2014)
"A quiet, slow-build haunted house story that reads like a timeless classic of the genre."

George Mann (editor): The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction: Volume 2 (The Guardian, review published March 2008)
"Highlights include Dan Abnett's brilliantly deadpan version of humankind's first encounter with visiting aliens, a mischievous story that defies all established science-fiction convention..."

George RR Martin: Dreamsongs (The Guardian, review published October 2007)
"...the ideal way to discover one of genre fiction's finest writers."

Paul McAuley: Cowboy Angels (The Guardian, review published June 2008)
Unfortunately, space constraints meant the last line of my review was dropped: "A page-turning thriller of history, fate and quantum physics."

TC McCarthy: Exogene (The Guardian, review published March 2012)
"McCarthy's future is a brutal one, with a never-ending resource war being fought by clones, machines and humans, and any mix of the three."

Ian McDonald: Brasyl (The Guardian, review published August 2008)
"There are few if any science-fiction writers currently working who display the kind of flair, intelligence and sheer pizzazz that is par for the course with Ian McDonald."

Ian McDonald: The Dervish House (The Guardian, review published July 2011)
"With his novels of non-western futures, McDonald is making perhaps the best and most comprehensive effort in current science fiction to map out how the near future might unfold."

Gary McMahon: Pretty Little Dead Things (The Guardian, review published November 2010)
"Not so much hard-boiled as hard-nuked, this novel puts McMahon firmly in the front ranks of the new wave of British horror."

Stephanie Meyers: The Host (The Guardian, review published August 2009)
"...veers too often into either melodrama or sheer tedium... little more than a half-decent doorstep-sized chunk of light entertainment."

China Miéville: Kraken (The Guardian, review published May 2012)
"Kraken starts almost as a straight police procedural, albeit one where the crimes defy any attempts to understand how they might have been executed. What follows is a step by step descent into madness..."

Michael Moorcock: The Best of Michael Moorcock (The Guardian, review published May 2009)
"This collection illustrates the breadth of Moorcock's talent... A long-overdue retrospective."

Christopher Moore: The Stupidest Angel: A Heart warming Tale of Christmas Terror (The Guardian, review published December 2008)
"Pacy and engaging, this is a comic fantasy crammed with sharp and funny one-liners from the man who has previously come up with the memorably titled Island of the Sequined Love Nun and The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove."

Simon Morden: The Curve of the Earth (The Guardian, review published April 2013)
"British science fiction at its gritty, hard-boiled best."

Mark Morris (editor): The Spectral Book of Horror Stories (The Guardian, review published November 2014)
"An always interesting and sometimes deeply chilling selection of short horror from both established and newer writers."

James Morrow: Shambling Towards Hiroshima (The Guardian, review published February 2009)
"A smart and wry portrayal of a 1940s Hollywood that never quite existed... Few authors could successfully combine politics, humour and the line 'We can thank our lucky stars that Hitler never got the lizard', but Morrow pulls it off with aplomb."

Andy Murray: Phobic (The Guardian, review published June 2007)
"...horror stories set in a world of mobile phones, the internet and computer gaming, fears induced by climate change, child abduction and the sheer terror of going to Ikea and not finding a single thing you want... a patchy but rewarding anthology."

KJ Parker: The Company (The Guardian, review published September 2009)
"It's hard to like a book peopled by characters who are ruthless, selfish, insensitive and ready to betray even those closest to them, and yet who simultaneously lack the charisma or attitude to be true antiheroes... a story of unpleasant people being not very nice to each other that is compelling and leaves the reader wanting more."

Cherie Priest: Boneshaker (The Guardian, review published November 2012)
"A gloriously Technicolor steampunk romp."

Hannu Rajaniemi: The Quantum Thief (The Guardian, review published October 2011)
"There are science-fiction novels that impress and those that entertain. All too rarely the two come together, but in this baroque theft caper Hannu Rajaniemi has pulled it off with aplomb."

Kit Reed: The Night Children (The Guardian, review published October 2009)
"Written for a teen audience, The Night Children combines the satirical bite of Reed's adult work with the brooding intensity of her 'Kit Craig' psychological thrillers... a twenty-first century fairy tale of the darkest variety."

Kit Reed: Enclave (The Guardian, review published July 2010)
"The story of how one man's manipulative, controlling approach to dealing with problem children unravels in the face of the reality of putting all those kids together in a confined space."

Alastair Reynolds: Galactic North (The Guardian, review published November 2007)
"A perfect illustration of how the author sets intimate stories against huge backdrops and somehow pulls it off."

ARRR Robert's (sic): Doctor Whom, or E.T. Shoots and Leaves (The Guardian, review published July 2007)
"Pieced together like a fine watch this is not, which is precisely the point of its clever construction..."

Adam Roberts: Yellow Blue Tibia (The Guardian, review published May 2010)
"A convoluted - sometimes frustratingly so - puzzle of a story, continually wrong-footing the reader on a road-trip to Chernobyl in the fateful year of 1986... a writer who manages to combine intellectual challenge and sheer entertainment as few others can"

Nicholas Royle: Regicide (The Guardian, review published August 2011)
"Royle's deceptively informal, finely crafted prose draws you in so that each step in the deepening of Carl's story seems logical, inevitable even, until you end up in a place that is decidedly strange and nightmarishly menacing."

Steven Savile: Time's Mistress (The Guardian, review published October 2014)
"These are stories of loss and punishment, but even at his darkest Savile has a flair for finding beauty in the macabre, using usually-subtle horror to deliver a succession of poignant insights into love and humanity."

Gaie Sebold: Babylon Steel (The Guardian, review published February 2012)
"A pacy fantasy romp, just a little wacky and off-beat."

Dan Simmons: The Terror (The Guardian, review published January 2008)
"...sometimes the detail generates incredibly rich and evocative storytelling; at others it's like reading a textbook."

Jeff Somers: The Electric Church (The Guardian, review published September 2007)
"An exhilarating example of powerful and entertaining storytelling."

Jonathan Strahan (editor): The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Eight (The Guardian, review published June 2014)
"Books as good as this should be of interest to any admirer of short fiction, regardless of genre."

Steph Swainston: The Modern World (The Guardian, review published November 2008)
"An impressive illustration of how fantasy does not have to be imitation Tolkien... a fascinating if somewhat fragmented novel."

Steve Rasnic Tem: Deadfall Hotel (The Guardian, review published April 2012)
"A beautifully crafted novel with hints of Mervyn Peake and Ray Bradbury, it has already been well-received within genre confines but is probably too claustrophobic to become a breakout novel."

Gordon van Gelder (editor): The Very Best of Fantasy and Science Fiction: Sixtieth Anniversary Anthology (The Guardian, review published August 2009)
"The word 'classic' could justifiably be applied to many stories in this volume, which, as a tribute to the magazine and an introduction to some of the finest authors of fantasy, SF and horror, is a landmark anthology."

Jeff and Ann VanderMeer: The New Weird (The Guardian, review published February 2007)
"...the common element being the author's willingness to 'surrender to the weird', to use the conventions of pulp fiction to commit literature, and to apply literary sophistication to genre landscapes." (Not quite sure whey they changed my "commit" to "locate" in the published version, changing the sense of this sentence, but hey ho...)

Jeff and Ann VanderMeer (editors): Fast Ships, Black Sails (The Guardian, review published November 2008)
"Pirates and plunder aplenty, along with spaceships, dragons, mermaids and sorcery." Note: the original draft of this review was more positive than the edited version that appeared.

Jeff VanderMeer: Shriek: an afterword (The Guardian, review published January 2007)
"When so much fiction published as fantasy is formulaic and dull, VanderMeer offers a refreshing reminder that genre fiction can still be challenging, intelligent and downright fun."

Jeff and Ann VanderMeer (editors): Sisters of the Revolution: A Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology (The Guardian, review published October 2015)
"A diverse celebration of speculative fiction ... a fine anthology, regardless of genre or politics."

Chuck Wendig: Blackbirds (The Guardian, review published May 2012)
"Vivid and violent, and with some pyrotechnic turns of phrase ... if you're looking for a sassy, hard-boiled, page-turning thriller with a paranormal slant Wendig has established himself as the go-to man."

Conrad Williams: The Unblemished (The Guardian, review published April 2008)
"The ruined London of the closing chapters of this stark, gripping novel will stay with you long after you have finished"

Walter Jon Williams: Deep State (The Guardian, review published March 2011)
"Williams' novel has all the twists and turns you would hope for, with multiple layers of conspiracy played off neatly against Dagmar's very personal story."

Erased
Erased
Erased by Nick Gifford

You're not paranoid if they really are after you. Someone is messing with Liam's world. All the rules have changed and his life has unravelled completely. What he does know is that someone is watching him. There are no bystanders in this terrifying game. "An exciting, fast paced book that will have you on the edge of your seat until the last page." Word Up

Find out more about this book.

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Tomorrow
Tomorrow
Tomorrow by Nick Gifford

Tomorrow: a future only you can see; a future only you can save... Tomorrow: an emotion- and time-tangled thriller set in the War Against Chronological Terror. Tomorrow: when three teenagers may have the power to save or destroy a world that is yet to be.

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Expatria: the box set
Expatria: the box set
Expatria: the box set

A lost colony, rediscovered by descendants of its original investors... When the expedition from the Holy Corporation of GenGen arrives on Expatria, for some it looks like salvation from a backward-looking, superstition-ridden society, but for others, it looks suspiciously like an invasion. "In the recognized front ranks of SF writers" Locus

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Piggies
Piggies
Piggies by Nick Gifford

Transported to a world inhabited by vampires, Ben befriends a girl called Rachel. She takes him to her farm to prove she's not like the other vampires, but that's when he discovers a terrible secret. And why is the book called Piggies? That's the worst horror of all. "Ingenious... this chilling story reads with all the power and demented logic of a thoroughly bad dream." The Independent

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The Accord
The Accord
The Accord

When Noah and Priscilla escape into the Accord, Priscilla's murderous husband plots to destroy the whole Accord and them with it. Where does the pursuit of revenge stop for immortals in an eternal world?

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alt.human / Harmony
alt.human / Harmony
alt.human / Harmony

Shortlisted for the Philip K Dick Award. (Note: the US title is Harmony; elsewhere it's alt.human.) The aliens are here. They always have been. And now, one by one, they're destroying our cities. In a world where nothing is as it seems, where humans are segregated and aliens can sing realities and tear worlds apart, a ragged band of survivors may be the only hope for humankind.

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
The Unlikely World of Faraway Frankie
The Unlikely World of Faraway Frankie
The Unlikely World of Faraway Frankie

Frankie is a boy who retreats from the harsh struggles of day-to-day life into daydreaming. But then... as Frankie's humiliations mount up, more and more elements from his faraway fantasy world start to appear in the real one. Can he use his imaginary world to escape? Can he learn how to construct the world around him from his dreams, and so get some kind of control over his life?

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Genetopia
Genetopia
Genetopia

The wilds: a world where genes mutate and migrate between species through plague and fever, but that's where Flint must go... "A minor masterpiece that should usher Brooke at last into the recognized front ranks of SF writers" (Locus)

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all titles:
Mementoes
Mementoes
Mementoes

Collected stories, in Newcon's Imaginings series.

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Riding the Serpent
Riding the Serpent
Riding the Serpent's Back

An old era is drawing to a close, a new era about to begin, and the great mage Donn has passed on his Talents to a new generation. When a rogue church leader threatens to set loose wild powers, Donn's children must oppose him but, also, they must contend with Donn himself: the old mage has not finished with his children yet. A fantasy epic of revolution, jealousy and earth-shattering magic.

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Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
The Bone House Gang
The Bone House Gang
The Bone House Gang by Nick Gifford

As a TV crew prepares to film the story of the lost prince's tomb, 12-year-old Jools Bone and his new friends Ned, Helen and Billy face a life and death rush to prevent history repeating itself. A dark and wickedly funny story by "the king of children's horror" (Sunday Express).

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Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Tomorrow
Tomorrow
Tomorrow by Nick Gifford

Tomorrow: a future only you can see; a future only you can save... Tomorrow: an emotion- and time-tangled thriller set in the War Against Chronological Terror. Tomorrow: when three teenagers may have the power to save or destroy a world that is yet to be.

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Barnes and Noble - Kobo - Apple
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Expatria: the box set
Expatria: the box set
Expatria: the box set

A lost colony, rediscovered by descendants of its original investors... When the expedition from the Holy Corporation of GenGen arrives on Expatria, for some it looks like salvation from a backward-looking, superstition-ridden society, but for others, it looks suspiciously like an invasion. "In the recognized front ranks of SF writers" Locus

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Barnes and Noble - Kobo - Apple
alt.human / Harmony
alt.human / Harmony
alt.human / Harmony

Shortlisted for the Philip K Dick Award. (Note: the US title is Harmony; elsewhere it's alt.human.) The aliens are here. They always have been. And now, one by one, they're destroying our cities. In a world where nothing is as it seems, where humans are segregated and aliens can sing realities and tear worlds apart, a ragged band of survivors may be the only hope for humankind.

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
infinity plus: quintet
infinity plus: quintet
infinity plus: quintet by Garry Kilworth, Lisa Tuttle, Neil Williamson, Stephen Palmer and Eric Brown (compiled by Keith Brooke) (editor)

Five stories from top writers of speculative fiction: science fiction, fantasy and the downright strange, stories from the heart, stories to make you think and wonder.

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Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Barnes and Noble - Kobo - Apple
Strange Divisions and Alien Territories
Strange Divisions and Alien Territories
Strange Divisions and Alien Territories (editor)

Explores the sub-genres of science fiction from the perspectives of a dozen top SF authors, combining a critical viewpoint with exploration of the challenges and opportunities facing authors working in SF today.

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Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
infinities
infinities
infinities by infinity plus and friends: Eric Brown, John Grant, Anna Tambour, Keith Brooke, Garry Kilworth, Iain Rowan, Kaitlin Queen, Linda Nagata, Scott Nicholson, Kristine Kathryn Rusch and Steven Savile (editor)

infinities is an anthology; it's a sampler; it's a catalogue for works published by infinity plus and our friends in the writing world. And it's free. Authors are: Eric Brown, John Grant, Anna Tambour, Keith Brooke, Garry Kilworth, Iain Rowan, Kaitlin Queen, Linda Nagata, Scott Nicholson, Kristine Kathryn Rusch and Steven Savile.

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Kobo
Embrace: tales from the dark side
Embrace: tales from the dark side
Embrace: tales from the dark side

Revisit the haunts of your youth, retell the story of your life, embrace your inner demons. Listen to the voices, go on...

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Faking It: accounts of the General Genetics Corporation
Faking It: accounts of the General Genetics Corporation
Faking It: accounts of the General Genetics Corporation

A brash entrepreneur buys a small company as a platform for his big ideas. He has a vision for the future of humankind, and the company will stop at nothing to get its own way.

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Liberty Spin: tales of scientifiction
Liberty Spin: tales of scientifiction
Liberty Spin: tales of scientifiction

Multiple personalities fighting for control of a single body; a single personality constantly splitting and reinventing itself and its past; a Mars that never was; an interstellar war that has always been.

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Memesis: modifiction and other strange changes
Memesis: modifiction and other strange changes
Memesis: modifiction and other strange changes

A world where islands of rock float on a molten sea, a man whose son flies high while he can only watch, a seaside town held together by the belief of its inhabitants.

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Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Segue: into the strange
Segue: into the strange
Segue: into the strange

Sidestep into modern Himalayan legend, join an ocean crossing that traverses more than just the sea; discover an 18th century mermaid incursion, and try to dodge the paparazzi in your head.

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Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
The Unlikely World of Faraway Frankie
The Unlikely World of Faraway Frankie
The Unlikely World of Faraway Frankie

Frankie is a boy who retreats from the harsh struggles of day-to-day life into daydreaming. But then... as Frankie's humiliations mount up, more and more elements from his faraway fantasy world start to appear in the real one. Can he use his imaginary world to escape? Can he learn how to construct the world around him from his dreams, and so get some kind of control over his life?

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
The Accord
The Accord
The Accord

When Noah and Priscilla escape into the Accord, Priscilla's murderous husband plots to destroy the whole Accord and them with it. Where does the pursuit of revenge stop for immortals in an eternal world?

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Barnes and Noble - Kobo - Apple
Infinity Plus: the anthology
Infinity Plus: the anthology
Infinity Plus: the anthology by Keith Brooke and Nick Gevers (editor)

A mass market omnibus of the two PS Publishing IP anthologies, published to coincide with the site's tenth anniversary.

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Erased
Erased
Erased by Nick Gifford

You're not paranoid if they really are after you. Someone is messing with Liam's world. All the rules have changed and his life has unravelled completely. What he does know is that someone is watching him. There are no bystanders in this terrifying game. "An exciting, fast paced book that will have you on the edge of your seat until the last page." Word Up

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Barnes and Noble - Apple
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Genetopia
Genetopia
Genetopia

The wilds: a world where genes mutate and migrate between species through plague and fever, but that's where Flint must go... "A minor masterpiece that should usher Brooke at last into the recognized front ranks of SF writers" (Locus)

Find out more about this book.

Ebook: Amazon US - Amazon UK - Barnes and Noble - Kobo - Apple
Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Like Father
Like Father
Like Father by Nick Gifford

Danny is terrified of being like his father, who ended up in prison after a night of savage violence. But then he finds his father's diary and uncovers his dark thoughts - and even darker secrets. Who was whispering to his father, goading him, leading him on? And what if they are coming back for Danny? "The king of children's horror..."Sunday Express

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Print: Amazon US - Amazon UK
Flesh and Blood
Flesh and Blood
Flesh and Blood by Nick Gifford

Matt's home life is falling to pieces as his mother seeks refuge from divorce by returning to the seaside town where she grew up. Separated from his friends, bored and discontented, Matt gradually becomes aware that his mother's family are the keepers of a terrifying secret. "Another great teen thriller." Spot On

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Infinity Plus two
Infinity Plus two
Infinity Plus two by Keith Brooke and Nick Gevers (editor)

More stories from some of the leading names in speculative fiction: Adam Roberts, Ian McDonald, Lisa Goldstein, Stephen Baxter, Michael Moorcock, Brian Stableford, Vonda McIntyre, Charles Stross, Paul Park, Paul McAuley, Eric Brown, Terry Bisson and Lucius Shepard; plus an introduction by John Clute.

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Piggies
Piggies
Piggies by Nick Gifford

Transported to a world inhabited by vampires, Ben befriends a girl called Rachel. She takes him to her farm to prove she's not like the other vampires, but that's when he discovers a terrible secret. And why is the book called Piggies? That's the worst horror of all. "Ingenious... this chilling story reads with all the power and demented logic of a thoroughly bad dream." The Independent

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Head Shots
Head Shots
Head Shots

An early collection of my short fiction; now out of print. All of the stories from this book are now available in my other collections.

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Infinity Plus one
Infinity Plus one
Infinity Plus one by Keith Brooke and Nick Gevers (editor)

Stories from some of the leading names in speculative fiction: Jeff VanderMeer, Tony Daniel, Ian R MacLeod, Paul Di Filippo, Mary Gentle, James Patrick Kelly, Kim Stanley Robinson, Garry Kilworth, Kit Reed, Michael Swanwick, Patrick O'Leary, Michael Bishop, Kim Newman; plus an introduction by Peter F Hamilton.

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Parallax View
Parallax View
Parallax View by Keith Brooke and Eric Brown

Stories that examine the interface between human and alien - a parallax view from two of Britain's top science fiction writers, both shortlisted for the 2013 Philip K Dick Award.

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Lord of Stone
Lord of Stone
Lord of Stone

Bligh, drawn irresistibly to the civil war in Trace, appears to be possessed by one of the six Lords Elemental. Bligh thinks he's going mad, but if he is then it's a madness shared by others...

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Expatria
Expatria
Expatria

The descendants of Expatria's first colonists from Earth have rejected technology. When Mathias Hanrahan joins a team trying to relearn the ancient technologies, against a background of impending war, he discovers that strange messages are coming from space.

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Expatria Incorporated
Expatria Incorporated
Expatria Incorporated

Arrival of the recontact mission from the Holy Corporation of GenGen on the formerly-lost colony world Expatria further complicates an already murderously complex web of religious and political intrigue. For some, it looks like salvation from a backward-looking, superstition-ridden society; for others, it looks suspiciously like an invasion.

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Keepers of the Peace
Keepers of the Peace
Keepers of the Peace

Jed Brindle is an alien. At least, that's what they call him on Earth. He's really a colony-bred soldier - augmented with cyborg implants - with the Extraterran Peacekeeping Force, fighting for control of what used to be the United States.

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